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  1. Abatement Of Action

    Putting an end to a law suit. If the matter is to be further pursued a new action or suit must be brought about.
  2. Abatement Of Bequest

    The procedure that will be carried out when there is not enough money in an estate to fulfil all debts and bequests.
  3. Abatement Of Debts And Legacies

    Abatement of debts and legacies is a common law doctrine of wills that holds that when the equitable assets of a deceased person are not sufficient to satisfy fully all the creditors, their debts must abate proportionately, and they must accept a dividend. In the case of legacies when the funds or assets out of which they are payable are not sufficient to pay them in full, the legacies abate in proportion, unless there is a priority given specially to any particular legacy. Annuities are also [...]
  4. Abatement Of Legacies

    Is the reduction of legacies for the purpose of paying the testator's debts. 2. When the estate is short of paying the debts and legacies, and there are general legacies and specific legacies, the rule is that the general legatees must abate proportionably in order to pay the debts; a specific legacy is not abated unless the general legacies cannot pay all the debts; in that case what remains to be paid must be paid by the specific legatees, who must, where there are several, abate their [...]
  5. Abatement Of Nuisances

    Is the prostration or removal of a nuisance. 3 Bl. 2. – 1. Who may abate a nuisance; 2, the manner of abating it. 1. Who may abate a nuisance. 1. Any person may abate a public nuisance. 2 Salk. 458; 9 Co. 454. 3. – 2. The injured party may abate a private nuisance, which is created by an act of commission, without notice to the person who has committed it; but there is no case which sanctions the abatement by an individual of nuisances from omission, except that of cutting branches [...]
  6. Abatement Of Tax Assessment

    Decreasing the amount of tax that is imposed upon a person.
  7. Abator

    A person who takes a property before the heir has a chance to get the property.
    Is, 1st, he who abates or prostrates a nuisance; 2, he who having no right of entry, gets possession of the freehold to the prejudiae of an heir or devisee, after the time when the ancestor died, and before the heir or devisee enters. See article Abatement. Litt. 897; Perk. 383; 1 Inst. 271; 2 Prest. Abst. 296. 300. As to the consequences of an abator dying in possession, See Adams' Eject. 43.
  8. Abatuda

    Obsolete. Any thing diminished; as, moneta abatuda, which is money clipped or diminished in value. Cowell, h. t.
  9. Abavus

    Civil law, is the great grandfather, or fourth male ascendant. Abavia, is the great grandmother, or fourth female ascendant.
  10. Abbey

    An abbey is a complex of buildings used by members of a religious order under the governance of an abbot or abbess. It provides a place for religious activities, work and housing of Christian monks and nuns. The concept of the abbey has developed over many centuries from the early monastic ways of religious men and women where they would live isolated from the lay community about them. Religious life in an abbey may be monastic. An abbey may be the home of an enclosed religious order or may be [...]
    Abbatia, is a society of religious persons, having an abbot or abbess to preside over them. Formerly some of the most considerable abbots and priors in England had seats and votes in the house of lords. The prior of St. John's of Jerusalem, was styied the first baron of England, in respect to the lay barons, but he was the last of the spiritual barons.
  11. Abbreviated Accounts

    A simplified financial statement that a specific small firm is allowed to file. It is filed with the registrar of companies in the United Kingdom. Almost half of the active UK firms have chosen abbreviated accounts for their companies. Another term for abridged accounts.
  12. Abbreviation

    An abbreviation (from Latin brevis, meaning short) is a shortened form of a word or phrase. It consists of a group of letters taken from the word or phrase. For example, the word abbreviation can itself be represented by the abbreviation abbr., abbrv. or abbrev. In strict analysis, abbreviations should not be confused with contractions, crasis, acronyms, or initialisms, with which they share some semantic and phonetic functions, though all four are connoted by the term "abbreviation" in loose [...]
    Practice. – The omission of some words or letters in writing; as when fieri facias is written fi. fa. 2. In writing contracts it is the better practice to make no abbreviations; but in recognizances, and many other contracts, they are used; as John Doe tent to prosecute, &c. Richard Roe tent to appear, &c. when the recognizances are used, they are drawn out in extenso. See 4 Ca. & P. 61; S.C.19E.C.L.R.268; 9 Co.48.
  13. Abbrochment

    Purchasing items in wholesale in order to sell them as retail. This prevents competitors from buying the good creating a monopoly. Abbroachment is another term for this business transaction.
    Obsolete. The forestalling of a market or fair.
  14. Abc Agreement

    When an employee and brokerage firm do business this is the resulting contract. It is done in the form of an outline that lists the rights of the firm. This agreement is applied when an employee opts into the New York Stock Exchange.
  15. ABC Analysis

    In materials management, the ABC analysis (or Selective Inventory Control) is an inventory categorization technique. ABC analysis divides an inventory into three categories- "A items" with very tight control and accurate records, "B items" with less tightly controlled and good records, and "C items" with the simplest controls possible and minimal records. The ABC analysis provides a mechanism for identifying items that will have a significant impact on overall inventory cost, while also [...]
    A systems analysis of items in order of importance that should be handled differently. This form of Pareto analysis in which the importance is listed by 'A' items are very important, 'B' items are important, 'C' items are marginally important.
  16. ABC Countries

    ABC countries, or ABC Powers, is a term sometimes used to describe the South American countries of Argentina, Brazil and Chile, which are seen as three of the most powerful and wealthy countries in South America. The term was mostly used in the first half of the 20th century when they worked together to develop common interests and a coordinated approach to issues in the region with relatively little influence from outside powers in contrast with the Cold War governments.
  17. Abc Inventory Classification

    The Pareto analysis as related to inventory control. There are three categories for the items in question. This is based on their revenue generation, turnover, or value. Typically this is done on the ABC model where an A is the best stock and C is the worse stock. Other terms for this concept are usage value analysis and ABC analysis.
  18. Abc Test

    A test used in some states to determine whether a person is an employee or an independent contractor for the purpose of determining state unemployment tax. Some courts using this test look at whether a worker meets three separate criteria to be considered an independent contractor: 1) The worker is free from the employer's control or direction in performing the work. 2) The work takes place outside the usual course of the business of the company and off the site of the business. 3) [...]
  19. Abdicate

    Disowning, relinquishing completely and to renounce.
  20. Abdication

    Abdication is the act of formally relinquishing monarchical authority.
    Government. 1. A simple renunciation of an office, generally understood of a supreme office. James II. of England; Charles V. of Germany; and Christiana, Queen of Sweden, are said to have abdicated. When James III of England left the kingdom, the Commons voted that he had abdicated the government, and that thereby the throne had become vacant. The House of Lords preferred the word deserted, but the Commons thought it not comprehensive enough, for then, the king might have the liberty of [...]

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