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  1. I

    The initial letter of the word "Instituta," used by some civilians in citing theInstitutes of Justinian. Tayl. Civil Law, 24.
  2. I Know It When I See It

    The phrase "I know it when I see it" is a colloquial expression by which a speaker attempts to categorize an observable fact or event, although the category is subjective or lacks clearly defined parameters. The phrase was famously used in 1964 by United States Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart to describe his threshold test for obscenity in Jacobellis v. Ohio. In explaining why the material at issue in the case was not obscene under the Roth test, and therefore was protected speech that [...]
  3. I-20

    The Form I-20 (also known as the Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Student Status-For Academic and Language Students) is a United States Department of Homeland Security, specifically ICE and the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), document issued by SEVP-certified schools (colleges, universities, and vocational schools) that provides supporting information on a student's F or M status. Since the introduction of the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) [...]
  4. I-94 Card

    Nonimmigrant visitors entering the United States with a visa are required to complete a Arrival-Departure Record (CBP Form I-94) or the Crewman Landing Permit (CBP Form I-95). The Form I-94 shows the date of arrival in the United States, the date when the authorized period of stay expires (the “Admitted Until” date), and the class of admission. The Form I-94 has two specific perforated sections. The nonimmigrant or the carrier representative must complete both sections of the form. The top [...]
  5. Ibernagium

    In old English law. The season for sowing winter corn. Also spelled "hibernagium" and "hybernagium."
  6. Ibi

    There.
  7. Ibi Semper Debet Fieri Triatio Ubi Juratores Meliorem Possunt Babere Notitiam

    7 Coke, lb. A trial should always be had where the jurors can be the best informed.
  8. Ibi Semper Debet Fieri Triatio Ubi Juratores Meliorem Possunt Habere Notitiam

    The trial of an action ought always to be held in that place where the jurors can have the better information.
  9. Ibid.

    Ibid. (Latin, short for ibidem, meaning "in the same place") is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the preceding endnote or footnote. This is similar in meaning to idem (meaning something that has been mentioned previously; the same), abbreviated Id., which is commonly used in legal citation. To find the ibid. source, one must look at the reference preceding it. Ibid. may also be used in the Harvard (name-date) system for [...]
    "In the same place". Abbreviation of ibidem , meaning "in the same place. Used when citing sources, to indicate the cited source came from the identical location as the preceding one.
    Ibidem.
    A Latin word that means the same.
  10. Ibidem

    In the same place.
    Lat In the same place; in the same book ; on the same page, etc. Abbreviated to "Ibid." or "ib,"
    This word is used in references, when it is intended to say that a thing is to be found in the same place, or that the reference has for its object the same thing, case, or other matter. IOU, contracts. The memorandum IOU, (I owe you), given by merchants to each other, is a mere evidence of the debt, and does not amount to a promissory note. Esp. Cas. N. A. 426; 4 Carr. & Payne, 324; 19 Eng. Com. L. Rep. 405; 1 Man. & Gran. 46; 39 E. C. L. R. 346; 1 Campb. 499; 1 Esp. R. 426; 1 Man. Gr. & So. [...]
  11. ICC Termination Act Of 1995

    The ICC Termination Act of 1995 is a United States federal law enacted in 1995 that abolished the Interstate Commerce Commission and simultaneously created its successor agency, the Surface Transportation Board.
  12. Iceni

    The Iceni or Eceni were a Brittonic tribe of eastern Britain during the Iron Age and early Roman era. Their territory included present-day Norfolk and parts of Suffolk and Cambridgeshire, and bordered the area of the Corieltauvi to the west, and the Catuvellauni and Trinovantes to the south. In the Roman period, their capital was Venta Icenorum at modern-day Caistor St Edmund. Julius Caesar does not mention the Iceni in his account of his invasions of Britain in 55 and 54 BC, though they may [...]
    The ancient name for the people of Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, and Huntingdonshire, in England.
  13. Icona

    An image, figure or representation of a thing. Du Cange,
  14. Ictus

    A bruise.
    In old English law. A stroke or blow from a club or stone; a bruise, contusion or swelling produced by a blow from a club or stone, as distinguished from "plaga," (a wound.) Fleta, lib. 1, c. 41, § 3. See Ictus orbis.
    An abbreviation for "jurisconsultus," one learned in the law; a jurisconsult
  15. Ictus Orbis

    A bruise, which see.
    In medical jurisprudence. A maim, a bruise, or swelling; any hurt without cutting the skin. When the skin is cut, the injury is called a "wound." Bract, lib. 2, tr. 2. cc. 5, 24.
    Med. jurisp. A maim, a bruise, or swelling; any hurt without cutting the skin. When the skin is cut, the injury is called a wound. (q. v.) Bract. lib. 2, tr. 2, c. 5 and 24. 2. Ictus is often used by medical authors in the sense of percussus. It is applied to the pulsation of the arteries, to any external lesion of the body produced by violence also to the wound inflicted by a scorpion or venomous reptile. Orbis is used in the sense of circlo, circuit, rotundity. It is applied also to the eye [...]
  16. Id Certum Est Quid Reddi Potest

    That is certain which can be made certain. See 137 Ind. 683, 45 Am. St. Rep. 218, 36 N. E. 132.
  17. Id Certum Est Quod Certum Reddi Potest

    That is certain which can be made certain. 2 Bl. Comm. 143; 1 Bl. Comm. 78; 4 Kent, Comm. 462; Broom, Max. 624.
  18. Id Certum Est Quod Certum Reddi Potest, Sed Id Magis Certum Est Quod De Semetipso Est Certum

    That is certain which can be made certain, but that is more certain which is certain in itself.
  19. Id Certum Est Quod Certum Reddi Potest, Sed Id Magis Eertum Est Quod De Semetipso Est Eertum

    That is certain which can be made certain, but that is more cortain which is certain of itself. 9 Coke, 47a.
  20. Id Est

    That is.
    Lat That is. Commonly abbreviated "i. e."

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