What is Grant?

Legal Definition
A grant, in law, is a transfer of property, generally from a person or other entity giving the property (the grantor) to a person or entity receiving the property (the grantee).

Historically, a grant was a transfer by deed of that which could not be passed by livery, an act evidenced by letters patent under the Great Seal, granting something from the king to a subject, and a technical term made use of in deeds of conveyance of lands to import a transfer.

Though the word "grant" was originally made use of, in treating of conveyances of interests in lands, to denote a transfer by deed of that which could not be passed by livery, and was applied only to incorporeal hereditaments, it became a generic term, applicable to the transfer of all classes of real property.

As distinguished from a mere license, a grant passes some estate or interest, corporeal or incorporeal, in the lands which it embraces; can only he made by an instrument in writing, under seal; and is irrevocable, when made, unless an express power of revocation is reserved. A license is a mere authority; passes no estate or interest whatever; may be made by parol; is revocable at will; and, when revoked, the protection which it gave ceases to exist.

In legal conveyancing, the grant is the means by which a party conveys title or encumbrance. In trust law, the grant is the act by which the settlor creates the trust for the interests of the trustee. In an option contract, the right of the optionee to exercise the option is considered a grant on the part of the optionor. In philanthropy, a donor may provide a grant of money.
-- Wikipedia
Legal Definition
Conveyancing, concessio. Technically speaking, grants are applicable to the conveyance of incorporeal rights, though in the largest sense, the term comprehends everything that is granted or passed from one to another, and is applied to every species of property. Grant is one of the usual words in a feoffment, and differs but little except in the subject-matter; for the operative words used in grants are dedi et concessi, "have given and granted."

2. Incorporeal rights are said to lie in grant and not in livery, for existing only in idea, in contemplation of law, they cannot be transferred by livery of possession; of course at common law, a conveyance in writing was necessary, hence they are said to be in grant, and to pass by the delivery of the deed.

3. To render the grant effectual, the common law required the consent of the tenant of the land out of which the rent, or other incorporeal interest proceeded; and this was called attorument. (q. v.) It arose from the intimate alliance between the lord and vassal existing under the feudal tenures., The tenant could not alien the feud without the consent of the lord, nor the lord part with his seigniory without the consent of the tenant. The necessity of attorument has been abolished in the United States. 4 Kent, Com. 479. He who makes the grant is called the grantor, and he to whom it is made the grantee. Vide Com. Dig. h. t.; 14 Vin. Ab. 27; Bac. Ab. h. t. 4 Kent, Com. 477; 2 Bl. Com. 317, 440; Perk. ch. 1; Touchs. c. 12; 8 Cowen's R. 36.

4. By the word grant, in a treaty, is meant not only a formal grant, but any concession, warrant, order, or permission to survey, possess or settle; whether written or parol, express, or presumed from possession. Such a grant may be made by law, as well as by a patent pursuant to a law., 12 Pet. R. 410. See, generally, 9 A. & E. 532; 5 Mass. 472; 9 Pick. 80.
-- Bouviers Law Dictionary
Legal Definition
A generic term applicable to all transfers of real property. 3 Washb. Real Prop. 181, 353. A transfer by deed of that which caimot be passed by livery. Williams, Real Prop. 147, 149; Jordan v. Indianapolis Water Co., 159 Ind. 337, 64 N. E. 680. An act evidenced by letters patent under the great seal, granting something from the king to a subject. Cruise, Dig. tit 33, 34; Downs v. United States, 113 Fed. 147, 6l C. a A. 100. A technical term made use of in deeds of conveyance of lands to import a transfer. 3 Washb. Real Prop. 378-380. Though the word "grant" was originally made use of, in treating of conveyances of interests in lands, to denote a transfer by deed of that which could not be passed by livery, and, of course, was applied only to incorporeal hereditaments, it has now become a generic term, applicable to the transfer of all classes of real property. 3 Washb. Real Prop. 181. As distinguished from a mere license, a grant passes some estate or interest, corporeal or incorporeal, in the lands which it embraces ; can only be made by an instrument in writing, under seal; and is irrevocable, when made, unless an express power of revocation is reserved. A license is a mere authority ; passes no estate or interest whatever; may be made by parol; is revocable at will; and, when revoked, the protection which it gave ceases to exist. Jamieson v. Millemann, 3 Duer (N. Y.) 255, 258. The term "grant," in Scotland, is used in reference

(1) to original dispositions of land, as when a lord makes grants of land among tenants;

(2) to gratuitous deeds. Paterson. In such case, the superior or donor is said to grant the deed; an expression totally unknown in English law. Mozley & Whitley. By the word "grant," in a treaty, is meant not only a formal grant, but any concession,' warrant, order, or permission to survey, possess, or settle, whether written or parol, express, or presumed from possession. Such a grant may be made by law, as well as by a patent pursuant to a law. Strother v. Lucas, 12 Pet. 436, 9 L Ed. 1137. And see Bryan v. Kennett, 113 U. S. 179, 5 Sun. Ch 413, 28 L. Ed. 908; Hastings v. Turnpike Co., 9 Pick. (Mass.) 80; Dudley v. Sumner, 5 Mass. 470.
-- Black's Law Dictionary
Legal Definition
A conveyance; an admission of truth; a conveyance by deed, especially by the government. See 50 La. Ann. 880, 24 South. 666.
-- Ballentine's Law Dictionary