What is Boolean Algebra?

Legal Definition
In mathematics and mathematical logic, Boolean algebra is the branch of algebra in which the values of the variables are the truth values true and false, usually denoted 1 and 0 respectively. Instead of elementary algebra where the values of the variables are numbers, and the main operations are addition and multiplication, the main operations of Boolean algebra are the conjunction and denoted as ∧, the disjunction or denoted as ∨, and the negation not denoted as ¬. It is thus a formalism for describing logical relations in the same way that ordinary algebra describes numeric relations.

Boolean algebra was introduced by George Boole in his first book The Mathematical Analysis of Logic (1847), and set forth more fully in his An Investigation of the Laws of Thought (1854). According to Huntington, the term "Boolean algebra" was first suggested by Sheffer in 1913.

Boolean algebra has been fundamental in the development of digital electronics, and is provided for in all modern programming languages. It is also used in set theory and statistics.
-- Wikipedia
Legal Definition
Studies binary variables that may only have two values which are true (1) and false (0), and also studies the mathematical operations performed on them. A set of rules known as Boolean logic are provided and are indispensable in digital switching circuit and computer circuit design. Operations are done via algebraic operators known as operators. Appropriately named after George Boole. (181565).