What is Bachelor Of Laws?

Legal Definition
The Bachelor of Laws (Latin: Legum Baccalaureus; LL.B. or B.L.) is an undergraduate degree in law (or a first professional degree in law, depending on jurisdiction) originating in England and offered in most common law jurisdictions. The "LL." of the abbreviation for the degree is from the genitive plural legum (of lex, law). Creating an abbreviation for a plural, especially from Latin, is often done by doubling the first letter (e.g., "pp" for "pages"), thus "LL.B." stands for Legum Baccalaureus in Latin. It is sometimes erroneously called "Bachelor of Legal Letters" to account for the double "L".

Historically, in Canada, Bachelor of Laws was the name of the first degree in common law, but is also the name of the first degree in Quebec civil law awarded by a number of Quebec universities. Canadian common-law LL.B. programmes were, in practice, second-entry professional degrees, meaning that the vast majority of those admitted to an LL.B. programme were already holders of one or more degrees, or, at a minimum (with very few exceptions), have completed two years of study in a first-entry, undergraduate degree in another discipline. Today in Canada the predominant first degree in common law is the Juris Doctor degree having replaced the LL.B.

Bachelor of Laws is also the name of the first degree in Scots law and South African law (both being pluralistic legal systems that are based partly on common law and partly on civil law) awarded by a number of universities in Scotland and South Africa, respectively.
-- Wikipedia
Legal Definition
The Bachelor of Laws (abbreviated LL.B., LLB, or rarely, Ll.B.) is an undergraduate degree in law generally offered after three or more years of college, and then three years of study of the law.

This degree originated in England and traditionally offered in most common law countries as the primary law degree. In the United States, the degree has been replaced by the J.D. (Juris Doctor), and many common law countries have or are in the process of phasing out their LL.B. degrees in favor of the J.D.

The "LL." of the abbreviation for the degree is from the genitive plural legum (of lex, legis f., law), thus "LL.B." stands for Legum Baccalaureus in Latin.
Illustrative caselaw
See, e.g. Mitchell v. Board of Bar Examiners, 892 N.E.2d 7 (Mass. 2008).
See also
Legal Definition
the degree that is conferred upon graduation from a college of law and is abbreviated to L.L.B.