What is Accelerated Depreciation?

Legal Definition
Accelerated depreciation refers to any one of several methods by which a company, for 'financial accounting' or tax purposes, depreciates a fixed asset in such a way that the amount of depreciation taken each year is higher during the earlier years of an asset’s life. For financial accounting purposes, accelerated depreciation is expected to be much more productive during its early years, so that depreciation expense will more accurately represent how much of an asset’s usefulness is being used up each year. For tax purposes, accelerated depreciation provides a way of deferring corporate income taxes by reducing taxable income in current years, in exchange for increased taxable income in future years. This is a valuable tax incentive that encourages businesses to purchase new assets.

For financial reporting purposes, the two most popular methods of accelerated depreciation are the double declining balance method and the sum-of-the-years’ digits method. For tax purposes, the allowable methods of accelerated depreciation depend on the tax law that the taxpayer is subject to. In the United States, the two currently allowable depreciation methods for tax purposes are both accelerated depreciation methods (ACRS and MACRS).
-- Wikipedia
Legal Definition
Any method of depreciation used by businesses for accounting or tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years of the life of a company asset, as opposed to the straight-line depreciation method.

Accelerated depreciation can be a useful tax incentive because it permits companies to defer payment of corporate income taxes by reducing the amount of taxable income each year. This in turn results in increased cash flow, encouraging companies to purchase more assets.
Legal Definition
This method of depreciaition helps companies to recover costs faster than through traditional straight line depreciation. Advantages of accelerated depereiation including quicker recovery of cost and lower taxes.
Legal Definition
Computing depreciation rates faster than the straight line option. The two methods are declining balance or taking the sum of the years digits as the depreciation rate. This results in a larger write off than the value. It suggests that the value is more because the longer the asset it owned it becomes less valuable. The total depreciation charge stays the same.