Supreme Court of the United States Court Cases

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  1. Ornelas v. United States (1996)

    Rehnquist, C. J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which Stevens, O'Connor, Kennedy, Souter, Thomas, Ginsburg, and Breyer, JJ., joined. Scalia, J., filed a dissenting opinion, post, p. 700.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 95-5257
  2. In Re WINSHIP (1970)

    Louis J. Lefkowitz, Attorney General, pro se, Samuel A. Hirshowitz, First Assistant Attorney General, and Marie L. Marcus, Assistant Attorney General, filed a brief for the Attorney General of New York as amicus curiae urging affirmance.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 778
  3. International Shoe Co. v. Washington (1945)

    George W. Wilkins, Assistant Attorney General of the State of Washington, with whom Smith Troy, Attorney General, and Edwin C. Ewing, Assistant Attorney General, were on the brief, for appellees.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 107
  4. Reeves v. Sanderson Plumbing Products, Inc. (2000)

    Patricia A. Millett argued the cause for the United States et al. as amici curiae urging reversal. On the brief were Solicitor General Waxman, Deputy Solicitor General Underwood, Matthew D. Roberts, C. Gregory Stewart, and Philip B. Sklover.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 99-536
  5. Graham v. Connor (1989)

    Lacy H. Thornburg, Attorney General of North Carolina, Isaac T. Avery III, Special Deputy Attorney General, and Linda Anne Morris, Assistant Attorney General, filed a brief for the State of North Carolina as amicus curiae urging affirmance.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 87-6571
  6. United States v. Leon (1984)

    Solicitor General Lee argued the cause for the United States. With him on the briefs were Assistant Attorney General Trott, Deputy Solicitor General Frey, Kathryn A. Oberly, and Robert J. Erickson.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 82-1771
  7. Heck v. Humphrey (1994)

    Scalia,J., delivered the opinion of the court, in which Rehnquist, C.J., and Kennedy, Thomas, and Ginsburg, JJ., joined. Thomas, J., filed a concurring opinion, post, p. 490. Souter, J., filed an opinion concurring in the judgment, in which Blackmun, Stevens, and O'Connor, JJ., joined, post, p. 491.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 93-6188
  8. Franks v. Delaware (1978)

    This case presents an important and longstanding issue of Fourth Amendment law. Does a defendant in a criminal proceeding ever have the right, under the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments, subsequent to the ex parte issuance of a search warrant, to challenge the truthfulness of factual statements made in an affidavit supporting the warrant?


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 77-5176
  9. Bruton v. United States (1968)

    This case presents the question, last considered in Delli Paoli v. United States, 352 U. S. 232, whether the conviction of a defendant at a joint trial should be set aside although the jury was instructed that a codefendant's confession inculpating the defendant had to be disregarded in determining his guilt or innocence.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 705
  10. Wolff v. McDonnell (1974)

    Solicitor General Bork argued the cause for the United States as amicus curiae urging reversal. With him on the brief were Assistant Attorney General Petersen, Deputy Solicitor General Frey, Gerald P. Norton, and Jerome M. Feit.[*]


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 73-679
  11. Johnson v. Zerbst (1938)

    Petitioner, while imprisoned in a federal penitentiary, was denied habeas corpus by the District Court.[1] Later, that court granted petitioner a second hearing, prompted by "the peculiar circumstances surrounding the case and the desire of the court to afford opportunity to present any additional facts and views which petitioner desired to present." Upon consideration of the second petition, the court found that it did "not substantially differ from the" first, "and for the reasons stated in [...]

    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 699
  12. Delaware v. Van Arsdall (1986)

    Richard E. Fairbanks, Jr., argued the cause for petitioner. With him on the briefs were Charles M. Oberly III, Attorney General of Delaware, and Gary A. Myers and Loren C. Meyers, Deputy Attorneys General.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 84-1279
  13. Taylor v. United States (1990)

    Michael R. Lazerwitz argued the cause for the United States. With him on the brief were Solicitor General Starr, Deputy Solicitor General Bryson, Assistant Attorney General Dennis, and Andrew Levchuk.[*]


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 88-7194
  14. St. Mary's Honor Center v. Hicks (1993)

    Scalia, J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which Rehnquist, C. J., and O'Connor, Kennedy, and Thomas, JJ., joined. Souter, J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which White, Blackmun, and Stevens, JJ., joined, post, p. 525.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 92-602
  15. North Carolina v. Alford (1970)

    Jacob L. Safron reargued the cause for appellant. With him on the briefs were Robert Morgan, Attorney General of North Carolina, and Andrew A. Vanore, Jr., joined in and adopted by the Attorneys General for their respective States as follows: Joe Purcell of Arkansas, David P. Buckson of Delaware, William J. Scott of Illinois, John B. Breckinridge of Kentucky, Joe T. Patterson of Mississippi, and Robert L. Woodahl of Montana; by the Government of the Virgin Islands; and by the National District [...]

    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 14
  16. Morrissey v. Brewer (1972)

    Briefs of amici curiae urging reversal were filed by William W. Falsgraf and Robert J. Kutak for the American Bar Association; by Melvin L. Wulf, Herman Schwartz, and Robert Plotkin for the American Civil Liberties Union; and by Craig Eldon Pinkus for James H. Russell.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 71-5103
  17. Neitzke v. Williams (1989)

    The question presented is whether a complaint filed in forma pauperis which fails to state a claim under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12(b)(6) is automatically frivolous within the meaning of 28 U. S. C. § 1915(d). The answer, we hold, is no.


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 87-1882
  18. Warth v. Seldin (1975)

    Petitioners, various organizations and individuals resident in the Rochester, N. Y., metropolitan area, brought this action in the District Court for the Western District of New York against the town of Penfield, an incorporated municipality adjacent to Rochester, and against members of Penfield's Zoning, Planning, and Town Boards. Petitioners claimed that the town's zoning ordinance, by its terms and as enforced by the defendant board members, respondents here, effectively excluded persons of [...]

    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 73-2024
  19. Motor Vehicle Mfrs. Assn. of United States, Inc. v. State Farm Mut. Automobile Ins. Co. (1983)

    Solicitor General Lee argued the cause for petitioners in No. 82-398. With him on the briefs were Assistant Attorney General McGrath, Deputy Solicitor General Geller, Edwin S. Kneedler, Robert E. Kopp, Michael F. Hertz, Frank Berndt, David W. Allen, Enid Rubenstein, and Eileen T. Leahy. Lloyd N. Cutler argued the cause for petitioners in No. 82-354. With him on the briefs were John H. Pickering, William R. Perlik, Andrew B. Weissman, William R. Richardson, Jr., Milton D. Andrews, Lance E. [...]

    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 82-354
  20. Browder v. Director, Dept. of Corrections of Ill. (1978)

    Raymond McKoski, Assistant Attorney General of Illinois, argued the cause for respondent. With him on the brief were William J. Scott, Attorney General, and Donald B. Mackay and Melbourne A. Noel, Jr., Assistant Attorneys General.[*]


    Court: Supreme Court of the United States Docket: 76-5325

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