United States v. Arturo Flores

Court Case Details
Court Case Opinion

NONPRECEDENTIAL DISPOSITION

To be cited only in accordance with Fed. R. App. P. 32.1 

 

United States Court of Appeals

For the Seventh Circuit 

Chicago, Illinois 60604 

 

Submitted March 19, 2015 

Decided March 20, 2015 

 

Before 

 

  DANIEL A. MANION, Circuit Judge 
 
  ILANA DIAMOND ROVNER, Circuit Judge
 
  DIANE S. SYKES, Circuit Judge 

 
No. 14‐1518   

 

 

 

 

Appeal from the 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States District Court 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 
 

 

for the Northern District of Illinois, 
Eastern Division. 
 
No. 11 cr 643‐1 
 
James B. Zagel, 
Judge

Plaintiff‐Appellee

 
 

v

 
ARTURO FLORES, 
 

Defendant‐Appellant. 

 

O R D E R 

 

Arturo Flores pleaded guilty to conspiring to possess and distribute one kilogram 

or more of a mixture containing heroin and 500 grams or more of a mixture containing 
cocaine, see 21 U.S.C. §§ 841(a)(1), 846, and was sentenced below the guidelines range to 
168 months’ imprisonment. Flores filed a notice of appeal, but his appointed lawyer 
asserts that the appeal is frivolous and seeks to withdraw under Anders v. California
386 U.S. 738 (1967). Flores has not accepted our invitation to comment on counsel’s 
motion. See 7

C

.

R. 51(b). Counsel submitted a brief explaining the nature of this case 

TH 

IR

 

and addressing the issues that an appeal of this kind might be expected to involve. 
Because the analysis in counsel’s brief appears to be thorough, we limit our discussion to 

No. 14‐1518 

 

Page 2 

 
the issues identified in that brief. See United States v. Bey, 748 F.3d 774, 776 (7th Cir. 2014); 
United States v. Wagner, 103 F.3d 551, 553 (7th Cir. 1996).   
 
 

Counsel begins by considering whether Flores could challenge the voluntariness 

of his guilty plea but neglects to say whether he consulted with his client about this 
possibility. See United States v. Konczak, 683 F.3d 348, 349 (7th Cir. 2012); United States v. 
Knox
, 287 F.3d 667, 670–71 (7th Cir. 2002). This uncertainty does not require that we deny 
this Anders submission, however, because the discussion in the brief and our own review 
of the record persuade us that any challenge to the guilty plea would be frivolous. Flores 
did not move to withdraw his guilty plea in the district court, and thus we would review 
the plea colloquy only for plain error. See United States v. Vonn, 535 U.S. 55, 59, 62–63 
(2002); United States v. Davenport, 719 F.3d 616, 618 (7th Cir. 2013). The transcript of the 
colloquy shows that the district court complied with Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil 
Procedure. The court notified Flores that he could be prosecuted for perjury if he lied 
during the hearing, F

.

R.

C

.

P. 11(b)(1)(A), advised Flores of the constitutional 

ED

 

 

RIM

 

rights he was waiving by pleading guilty and forgoing a trial, F

.

R.

C

.

P. 

ED

 

 

RIM

 

11(b)(1)(B)–(F), ensured that Flores understood the charges against him and the penalties 
he faced, F

.

R.

C

.

P. 11(b)(1)(G)–(M), and verified that no one had threatened or 

ED

 

 

RIM

 

coerced him into entering into the plea agreement, F

.

R.

C

.

P. 11(b)(2). The 

ED

 

 

RIM

 

government proffered a factual basis for the plea, which Flores acknowledged was 
correct. F

.

R.

C

.

P. 11(b)(3).   

ED

 

 

RIM

 

 

Counsel next considers whether Flores could argue that the district court 

inappropriately adopted a guidelines range agreed upon by the parties rather than 
calculate the range on its own. But as counsel rightly points out, the court correctly 
calculated the low end of the range, 188 months, based on a total offense level of 36 and 
criminal‐history category I. See U.S.S.G. § 2D1.1(a)(5), (c)(2), cmt. n.8(D) (2013). 

 
Counsel also addresses whether Flores could argue that the district court erred at 

sentencing by not asking him directly whether he had read the presentence report. 
See F

.

R.

C

.

P. 32(i)(1)(A). But as counsel notes, the district court verified with trial 

ED

 

 

RIM

 

counsel that he had discussed the presentence report with Flores; any such argument 
would thus be frivolous. See United States v. DeLeon, 704 F.3d 189, 197 (1st Cir. 2013).   

 
Counsel also considers whether Flores could argue that the district court erred by 

not considering three of his arguments in mitigation—that he should have been 
sentenced leniently based on his impoverished childhood, the costs associated with 
continuing to incarcerate a foreign national facing removal, and his poor health. But the 

No. 14‐1518 

 

Page 3 

 
first two mitigating arguments are “stock” arguments that district courts need not 
explicitly address. See United States v. Cheek, 740 F.3d 440, 455–56 (7th Cir. 2014) (difficult 
childhood); United States v. Mendoza, 576 F.3d 711, 722 (7th Cir. 2009) (deportation). As 
for his argument concerning his poor health, Flores did not explain why his health 
conditions warranted a lighter sentence, and, further, the district court discussed the 
ability of the Bureau of Prisons to adequately provide for Flores’s medical treatment. 
See Rita v. United States, 551 U.S. 338, 360 (2007); United States v. Collins, 640 F.3d 265, 271 
(7th Cir. 2011); United States v. Allday, 542 F.3d 571, 573 (7th Cir. 2008). 

 

 

Finally, counsel considers whether Flores could challenge the reasonableness of 

his prison sentence and properly concludes that such a challenge would be frivolous. 
Flores’s 168‐month sentence is below the low end of his calculated guidelines range of 
188 to 235 months. Counsel gives no reason to disregard the presumption that this 
below‐guidelines sentence is reasonable, see United States v. Womack, 732 F.3d 745, 747 
(7th Cir. 2013); United States v. Liddell, 543 F.3d 877, 885 (7th Cir. 2008), and we see none. 
The district court adequately considered the relevant 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a) factors, 
including Flores’s personal characteristics (noting that some defendants are particularly 
gifted at carrying out drug transactions and that Flores had “certain gifts that are worth 
something”) and the need to impose a sentence that reflected the seriousness of the 
offense (noting that the guidelines would be amended later that year to reflect a lower 
sentence for Flores’s offense of conviction). 
 
 

Accordingly, counsel’s motion to withdraw is GRANTED, and the appeal is 

DISMISSED.   

   

Referenced Cases